Holidays in Uzbekistan

Holidays in Uzbekistan

Public Holidays in Uzbekistan in 2021

Date Holiday
January 1, Fri New Year
January 14, Thu Homeland Defenders’ Day
March 8, Mon International Women’s Day
March 21, Sun Navruz
May 9, Sun Memorial Day
Date Holiday
May 13, Thu Eid al-Fitr (Ramadan Hayit)
July 20, Tue Eid al-Adha (Kurban Hayit)
September 1, Wed Independence Day
October 1, Fri Teachers’ and Mentors’ Day
December 8, Wed Constitution Day
Date Holiday
January 1,
Friday
New Year
January 14,
Thursday
Homeland Defenders’ Day
March 8,
Monday
International Women’s Day
March 21,
Sunday
Navruz
May 9,
Sunday
Memorial Day
May 13,
Thursday
Eid al-Fitr (Ramadan Hayit)
July 20,
Tuesday
Eid al-Adha (Kurban Hayit)
September 1,
Wednesday
Independence Day
October 1,
Friday
Teachers’ and Mentors’ Day
December 8,
Wednesday
Constitution Day

Public Holidays in Uzbekistan in 2022

Date Holiday
January 1, Sat New Year
January 14, Fri Homeland Defenders’ Day
March 8, Tue International Women’s Day
March 21, Mon Navruz
May 9, Mon Memorial Day
Date Holiday
To be announced Eid al-Fitr (Ramadan Hayit)
To be announced Eid al-Adha (Kurban Hayit)
September 1, Thu Independence Day
October 1, Sat Teachers’ and Mentors’ Day
December 8, Thu Constitution Day
Date Holiday
January 1,
saturday
New Year
January 14,
Friday
Homeland Defenders’ Day
March 8,
Tuesday
International Women’s Day
March 21,
Monday
Navruz
May 9,
Monday
Memorial Day
To be announced Eid al-Fitr (Ramadan Hayit)
To be announced Eid al-Adha (Kurban Hayit)
September 1,
Thursday
Independence Day
October 1,
Saturday
Teachers’ and Mentors’ Day
December 8,
Thursday
Constitution Day

In Uzbekistan, centuries of foreign influence prior to independence helped to form a unique community of people who are distinguished by their hospitality, tolerance, close-knit society and readiness to welcome others into their happiness.

Holidays in Uzbekistan are fun celebrations that include both secular and religious, local and international, ancient and 20th-century observances. With great exuberance, the people of Uzbekistan rise to each occasion with gifts, homemade treats, dancing and festive gatherings.

January 1st, New Year

New Year is one of the most beloved holidays on the Uzbekistan calendar. As preparations begin in early December, the weeks leading up to the New Year are very celebratory in themselves. City streets, transformed by New Year trees and glittering garlands, are filled with people rushing to buy toys, gifts, savory delicacies and enough sweets to last for days. Santa Claus and his granddaughter Snow Maiden can be seen at restaurants, shops and plazas throughout the holiday season.

As New Year is a family holiday in Uzbekistan, most people prefer to spend New Year's Eve at home with their family and relatives. Yet from mid-December until the Old New Year on January 13, celebrations are held with friends, colleagues and classmates in gatherings which typically include an entertainment program, special menu and various surprises. Read more...

January 14, Homeland Defenders’ Day (Men’s Day)

On January 14, 1992, the Armed Forces of Uzbekistan were organized under the newly independent state, prompting the government to declare this date as Homeland Defenders’ Day.

Although not counted among public holidays in Uzbekistan, Homeland Defenders’ Day is a significant event. Celebrations involving the Ministry of Defense, Ministry of the Interior, National Security Service and other agencies are held in city plazas, where congratulations and awards are issued by the government.

In addition to being a professional military holiday, Homeland Defenders’ Day is widely observed as Men’s Day in Uzbekistan. At home, school and the workplace, men are congratulated with gifts and treated to special meals as a show of respect and admiration for their role in the family and their military service. Read more...

March 8, International Women's Day

International Women's Day, celebrated on March 8th, coincides with the first awakenings of spring. The holiday has long been synonymous with beauty and femininity and is a day to shower women with special attention, flowers and gifts. Jewelry, perfumes, chocolates, cakes and the like disappear from store shelves in Uzbekistan as women are honored in ever sphere of society. Special meals are prepared and toasts, poems and songs are recited in honor of the female gender, with both professional and small-scale performances held throughout the country. Although in many ways the 8th of March serves as the equivalent of Mother’s Day in Uzbekistan, its scope is broader and includes recognition of all wives, mothers, sisters, daughters, girlfriends and female classmates. Read more...

March 21, Navruz Holiday

Navruz (Nowruz) is without dispute the most colorful holiday in Uzbekistan. Its history dates back three thousand years and is rooted in the ancient cult of sun worship and Zoroastrianism, which were once widespread in Persia and Central Asia. Today it is associated with the rebirth of nature, new life, joy and kindness.

Celebrations often last 2-3 days and involve folk festivals, lavishly decorated streets, traditional sports competitions, home visitations and joyous hospitality. Many believe that forgiving your enemies, living peaceably and helping the needy during this season will bring good luck to the coming year. Traditionally, seven special dishes are served as a further symbol of fortune for the months to follow.

The most popular Navruz dish in Uzbekistan is sumalak, a taffy-like treat prepared from sprouted wheat and flour. Although customarily cooked the night before Navruz, it can be made any time in early spring. The tedious process of stirring the huge cauldron of ingredients nonstop unites friends, relatives and neighbors in a joyful gathering punctuated with music, laughter and fun. Read more...

May 9, Memorial Day

Memorial Day, observed in honor of the heroes who sacrificed their lives in World War II, is an important national holiday in Uzbekistan. Hundreds of thousands of Uzbek men fought on the front lines, while women and the elderly toiled at home. The Uzbek SSR also welcomed many refugees to the land during these difficult years.

Uzbekistan lost more than 450,000 citizens during the war. On May 9, residents of Uzbekistan join with millions of people from the former Soviet Union in congratulating war veterans on their bravery and in laying flowers at memorials and monuments. At the Walk of Fame and Remembrance in Tashkent’s Mustakillik Square, the name of every Uzbek who perished in World War II is carved on granite steles. Nearby, a bronze statue of a mourning mother stands as a symbol for the collective grief of Uzbekistan during the war. Read more...

Date changes, Eid al-Fitr (Ramadan Hayit)

Eid al-Fitr (Roza or Ramadan Hayit) is an Islamic holiday marking the end of Ramadan, the annual month of fasting. Since 1992, Ramadan Hayit has been a public holiday in Uzbekistan.

Preparations for Ramadan Hayit begin a day prior, on Arafah (Eve). On this day nearly every Uzbek family prepares the national rice dish plov, as well as a myriad of breads and sweets. The day itself is a symbol of purification and faith. It begins with men gathered at the local mosque for prayer, although these may also be recited at home, followed by customary visits to the graves of loved ones.

Ramadan Eid in Uzbekistan lasts for three days in total, during which time people receive many guests, visit relatives and share homemade goodies with neighbors and friends. The holiday is particularly enjoyed by children, who receive special toys and treats from parents and relatives. Read more...

Date changes, Eid al-Adha (Kurban Hayit)

Eid al-Adha (Kurban Hayit) is one of the most important holidays of the Islamic world, for it marks the end of the pilgrimage to Mecca, known as Hajj. It is celebrated 70 days after the end of Eid al-Fitr. Since 1991, Kurban Hayit has been considered an important Uzbekistan holiday.

As with Ramadan Hayit, preparations begin on the eve of the holiday, known as Arafah, as special baked goods are prepared in every Uzbek household. In the evening, a pre-holiday pilaf is cooked and exchanged with others: The rice dish is piled into a large ceramic bowl, topped with baked treats and delivered to friends and neighbors.

As in other countries, Eid al-Adha in Uzbekistan begins with a special morning prayer known as Hayit Namaz, followed by a customary visit to the graves of loved ones. During the three days of Kurban Hayit, many families make a sacrifice, which in Uzbekistan has traditionally been a sheep. The meat is then divided into three parts, which are distributed equally between relatives, the needy and guests who have been specially invited for the occasion. Read more...

September 1, Independence Day

Independence Day was the first official holiday declared by the newly independent republic, and every year since then the people of Uzbekistan have celebrated it with full gusto.

In each of the 12 regions of Uzbekistan, a unique holiday program is prepared which reflects the traditions and culture specific to that region. Activities include folk performances, sports competitions, special shows and noisy fairs filled with the colorful displays of local craftsmen. In Tashkent, the main festivities are fittingly held at Mustakillik Square (Independence Square), where hundreds of participants, dozens of bands, dance troupes and pop stars are gathered for an unforgettable event. The evening concludes with a grandiose fireworks show. Read more...

October 1, Teachers’ and Mentors’ Day

True to its name, Teachers’ and Mentors’ Day in Uzbekistan is an opportunity to express gratitude to those who have impacted lives through education. Like all Uzbekistan holidays, it reflects an important cultural value, for the people of Uzbekistan have long held a special respect for educators: it is not unusual for teachers to be invited to a family wedding or celebration, where they are shown special honor, and students will sometimes stay in contact with a beloved teacher even after they have grown and are raising children and grandchildren of their own.

In the days leading up to Teachers’ and Mentors’ Day, various events are held in every school, from preschool up through university. Special performances, matinees and concerts are staged, and teachers are gifted with flowers, cards and chocolates. Some graduates will even return to congratulate former teachers on this day. Read more...

December 8, Constitution Day

The Constitution of Uzbekistan was adopted on December 8, 1992, having been preceded by 2.5 years of arduous work by the Constitutional Commission. When drafting the constitution, international expertise and the national situation was taken into account.

December 8 is a public holiday in Uzbekistan and a day off of work. Streets are decorated with flags, while concerts, sporting events and exhibitions are held in the capital. Read more...

New Year In Uzbekistan the New Year’s Day is one of the most favorite and long-awaited holidays. Preparations that might start a month in advance result in a festive family gatherings on 31st of December
Uzbekistan
Uzbekistan
Homeland Defenders’ Day (Men’s Day) Homeland Defenders’ Day is a significant event. Celebrations involving the Ministry of Defense, Ministry of the Interior, National Security Service and other agencies are held in city plazas, where congratulations and awards are issued by the government.
Uzbekistan
Uzbekistan
International Women’s Day International Women's Day, celebrated on March 8th, coincides with the first awakenings of spring. The holiday has long been synonymous with beauty and femininity and is a day to shower women with special attention, flowers and gifts.
Uzbekistan
Uzbekistan
Navruz Holiday Navruz (Nowruz) is without dispute the most colorful holiday in Uzbekistan. Its history dates back three thousand years and is rooted in the ancient cult of sun worship and Zoroastrianism, which were once widespread in Persia and Central Asia. Today it is associated with the rebirth of nature, new life, joy and kindness.
Uzbekistan
Uzbekistan
Memorial Day Memorial Day, observed in honor of the heroes who sacrificed their lives in World War II, is an important national holiday in Uzbekistan.
Uzbekistan
Uzbekistan
Eid al-Fitr (Ramadan Hayit) Eid al-Fitr (Roza or Ramadan Hayit) is an Islamic holiday marking the end of Ramadan, the annual month of fasting. Since 1992, Ramadan Hayit has been a public holiday in Uzbekistan.
Uzbekistan
Uzbekistan
Eid al-Adha (Kurban Hayit) Eid al-Adha (Kurban Hayit) is one of the most important holidays of the Islamic world, for it marks the end of the pilgrimage to Mecca, known as Hajj. It is celebrated 70 days after the end of Eid al-Fitr.
Uzbekistan
Uzbekistan
Independence Day The 1st of September, 1991, is the birthday of new independent republic of Uzbekistan. Independence Day is one of the most important public holiday of the country.
Uzbekistan
Uzbekistan
Teachers’ and Mentors’ Day Teachers’ and Mentors’ Day in Uzbekistan is an opportunity to express gratitude to those who have impacted lives through education.
Uzbekistan
Uzbekistan
Constitution Day The date of adoption of the main law of the country, the constitution, is the great public holiday. Uzbekistan adopted the constitution on December 8, 1992.
Uzbekistan
Uzbekistan